Tu-Na Quilts: Let’s Make Elephants

Here’s what my elephant quilt looked like when the project stalled in March.

 

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Here’s how it traveled to North Dakota with me so that it could be finished.

1a

I labeled each block and each row and used lots of Clover clips to hold the labels in place. Then all the sewn rows and the ones needing sewing were put into a new gallon Ziploc bag.

 

The trip took three days and I didn’t want any pieces getting lost or mixed up.

2a

I also clipped each row together and included my hand-drawn pattern. I had bought a package of 100 Clover clips when I was in Bismarck last summer (using a 50% off coupon from JoAnns) and took half of them to Arizona in the fall. Now they’ve come back to my ND home. I sure hope I remember to take them back to AZ with me or I’ll be buying more down there.

 

This quilt is for my best friend’s granddaughter. That baby just turned 6 months old and I might have to make it larger if I dawdle any longer.

6a

I’ve already got 7 rows sewn. See how I labeled these rows. for transport? I sewed the paper label with the row number on the end of each finished row using a large stitch length. It only took a couple of minutes to do this and it is better than using pins.

 

My goal for this week is to move this project forward by:

  1. Finish sewing the chevron rows.
  2. Deciding whether to make the quilt a tad wider. I have most of the blocks made already if I decide to do so. Currently it measures 40″ x 56″. By adding two more blocks to each row (which completes the next peak in the chevron), it would be 48″ x 56″. What would you do?
  3. Sewing up those three elephants and their background strip.
  4. Sewing the top together.
  5. Sandwiching the layers.
  6. Free-motion quilting it. I already have a plan.

This list may be a bit ambitious (realistically I may only get thru number 3) as I also have to sew up and mail the three May Bee blocks this week. In addition, I am Queen for one Bee next month so I need to sew up a couple of test blocks and prepare a post.

To motivate me and keep me going, I thought I’d link with Em’s Scrapbag for Moving It Forward (love the tag line for her blog—”When life falls to pieces, make a quilt”).

And in case any of you are transporting quilt blocks, I’ll link with Yvonne at Quilting Jetgirl for Tips and Tutorials Tuesday since I have some tips on keeping your blocks and rows organized. (Button is on the sidebar).

What I Learned Today:

  1. I need something or someone to get me motivated.
  2. Cold coffee tastes really good. I have a habit of pouring myself a cup and finding it three hours later.

Question: Would you make this quilt wider or not?

Other linky parties that I’m attending: Midweek Makers at Quilt Fabrication and Let’s Bee Social on Sew Fresh Quilts and Works in Progress at Silly Mama Quilts.

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33 thoughts on “Tu-Na Quilts: Let’s Make Elephants

  1. Tami Von Zalez

    Why do you want to make it wider? I think the original size you’ve chosen is fine.
    I like this post because it really does show the struggle with some projects. I read some of these blogs and finished quilts magically appear one week after the other. Where do these people find the time?

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    1. Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats Post author

      I was unsure 40” is wide enough for that 6 month old anymore, considering we are heading into summer when quilts aren’t used much. Thinking about if a 48” wide one would be better as this tyke is not getting any younger. I second guess myself so much that my work often starts to stall.

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  2. Rochelle Summers

    I do like the idea of a wider quilt because the baby is growing by leaps and bounds. Love the idea of sewing the row # on the end of the row…and if you use basting stitch it will come out easily. Those clips are great aren’t they and thank heaven for 50% (and sometimes 60%) off coupons!!

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  3. piecefulwendy

    That’s why I only drink one cup of coffee in the morning. I get too absorbed in what I’m doing and it just gets cold. However, I don’t mind cold coffee because it reminds me of my grandmother, who would drink hers even if it went cold. 🙂 Cute quilt!

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  4. kathy70

    I am a fan of quilts being a rectangle rather than square and the sides would close in if you added more blocks to the sides. If you have blocks left at the end, you can always use them as another row, but I don’t do conventional so I would but them either on the back or make a small burp cloth with the extra blocks. Great looking quilt 🙂

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    1. Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats Post author

      That worries me as I sewed the ones in AZ on my new Bernina and will be finishing this on my old Pfaff. I will just have to make sure my ¼” seam allowances are the same. I know that’s a no-no –using two different machines to sew up a quilt.

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  5. Carolyn J

    I never got to drink hot or warm coffee when teaching… always had a cup first thing in the morning in my classroom but was lucky to grab a sip between classes and usually drank it cold by lunchtime! Love clover clips… so much better than pins.

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  6. rl2b2017

    Hi Karen,
    I guess I would keep it the original width. As someone else mentioned, then you do not have to piece the backing. It sure will be cute when it’s finished! ~smile~
    Roseanne

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  7. Andrea H

    You are amazingly organized, as shown by how well you kept the project in baggies and numbered. I would go ahead and make it bigger (but that’s just me) if you were hoping the quilt to get used as long as possible. I can’t wait to see how this looks when all is said and done.

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  8. qltr89

    I tend to make baby quilts wider and longer than crib size except when I am pressed for time.

    It made me chuckle when I read about your coffee. I also nurse the same cup of coffee all day. I microwave it and take a sip. It’s too funny.

    Thank you for sharing the idea of sewing the row number with large stitches to the end of the row.

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  9. inquiringquilter

    This quilt design is easy to make wider (assuming you have the fabric to make the extra HSTs) so that’s what I would do. I prefer to make wider quilts for children so they can use them longer. Thanks for linking up to Wednesday Wait Loss! Love the colors in this quilt. Too much fun!

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  10. Susan

    LOL cold coffee! I agree, though I don’t find it three hours later! Cute quilt design – just dig in and get ‘er done! Thanks for sharing on Midweek Makers

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  11. Kathy Swallows

    Such cute fabrics! It’s going to be a fun baby quilt. Good luck getting it all put together. The hardest part of coming back to a stalled project is figuring out where you are. Looks like you’ve got that all worked out.

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  12. Sharon

    You are so organized! I would definitely make the quilt bigger so it can be used longer. I love iced coffee and always make extra so I can drink it cold too.

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  13. Pingback: Tu-Na Quilts: We Have an Elephant Parade | Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats

  14. Pingback: Tu-Na Quilts: Now, We Have an Elephant Parade | Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats

  15. Pingback: Tu-Na Quilts: Progress on “She Has Her Mommy’s Nose” | Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats

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